Hong Kong Politics & Protest

Q&A: Meet the Hongkongers who flew back to vote in the legislative election

As well as local citizens casting their ballots in Sunday’s Legislative Council election, there are also voters who specifically came back to Hong Kong to make their voices heard. HKFP catches up with four Hongkongers who made the trip back to the city.

Amy Au

Amy Au. Photo: Supplied.

Amy Au, 28, working in communications and media in Copenhagen

Why did you come back to vote?

This is the first time I had a candidate that I truly wanted to vote for, because in the past there was no one who publicly advocated Hong Kong independence.

I was concerned that Hong Kong independence was a topic that was not supported by many – I was afraid my candidate would not even be able to get his election deposit back. Therefore, when I got a new job offer, I told my supervisor that I would book my flight back for election day.

However, the candidate I wanted to vote for was already disqualified by the government.

Did you need to make any sacrifices to come back for your vote? 

I took a five-day paid leave. But my supervisor said that, since I asked for leave to exercise my civil rights, I will get a few more days off in compensation.

Was voting the first thing you did when you came back?

Yes, I went to vote right after I got off the plane in the morning. I only went home after I voted.

What will you do for the rest of the day after voting?

I will meet my friends and relatives and try to get them to vote.

Deryck Chan

Deryck Chan. Photo: Deryck Chan.

Deryck Chan, 25, research engineer in Cambridge, UK

Why did you come back to vote?

I have a passion for the city where I grew up and where most of my family lives. Hong Kong has a weird political system and I want to use whatever little power I have to make Hong Kong better.

Did you need to make any sacrifices to come back for your vote? 

I’m fortunate enough to be able to take annual leave in September and am grateful for the support of my colleagues in Cambridge.

Was voting the first thing you did when you came back?

No, I arrived on Tuesday and was impressed by the scale and passion shown in election campaigns, particularly by younger candidates.

What will you do for the rest of the day after voting?

I’ll stay in Hong Kong until mid-autumn festival to spend more time with family and enjoy Hong Kong food.

Enoch Lieu

Enoch Lieu. Photo: Supplied.

Enoch Lieu, 22, international relations student in the UK

Why did you come back to vote?

I literally arrived in Hong Kong this morning and I came back to vote.

I believe this is my duty as a citizen of Hong Kong to cast my vote and I believe I have to make my voice heard in this critical moment in Hong Kong. This is the first election in the history of Hong Kong where independence is on the agenda and I have to participate in this momentous moment.

Did you need to make any sacrifices to come back for your vote?

I am currently occupied with university work, so coming back is sort of taking a break from it.

Was voting the first thing you did when you come back?

Yes, I voted first thing after leaving the airport.

What will you do for the rest of the day after voting?

I will go to see people canvassing and will probably go to the central counting station.

Jimmy Wong. Photo: HKFP.

Jimmy Wong. Photo: HKFP.

Jimmy Wong, 34, software engineer in London

Why did you come back to vote?

I came back to defend the opposition camp’s veto power in the geographical constituency.

Did you need to make any sacrifices to come back for your vote?

I asked for two days off and paid £754 (HK$7,774) for the flight.

Was voting the first thing you did when you came back?

The first thing I did was sleep. But I have voted.

What will you do for rest of the day after voting?

I will meet my friends.

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Q&A: Meet the Hongkongers who flew back to vote in the legislative election